The Terrible Fate of Two Young Crows Who Challenged Hooty the Owl: And Other Realistically Harrowing Tales of the Natural World (The Lost DARK Tales of Thornton W. Burgess Book 1) - PDF free download eBook

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  • Published: 22.01.2019
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Introduction

They laughed when they asked the Bedtime Story Man, "When do your predators eat?" They're not laughing anymore. Hooty the Owl was fast losing his temper. Mrs. Hooty was losing hers...

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Details of The Terrible Fate of Two Young Crows Who Challenged Hooty the Owl: And Other Realistically Harrowing Tales of the Natural World (The Lost DARK Tales of Thornton W. Burgess Book 1)

Original Title
The Terrible Fate of Two Young Crows Who Challenged Hooty the Owl: And Other Realistically Harrowing Tales of the Natural World (The Lost DARK Tales of Thornton W. Burgess Book 1)
Edition Format
Kindle Edition
Number of Pages
204 pages
Book Language
English
Ebook Format
PDF, EPUB

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Some brief overview of this book

They laughed when they asked the Bedtime Story Man, "When do your predators eat?" They're not laughing anymore. Hooty the Owl was fast losing his temper. Mrs. Hooty was losing hers even faster.

More and more angry sounded their hisses. Louder and louder they snapped their bills. But the young Crows who were tormenting them by screaming at them and pretending to attack them They laughed when they asked the Bedtime Story Man, "When do your predators eat?" They're not laughing anymore.

Hooty the Owl was fast losing his temper. Mrs. Hooty was losing hers even faster. More and more angry sounded their hisses.

Louder and louder they snapped their bills. But the young Crows who were tormenting them by screaming at them and pretending to attack them took no heed of this. Only a few of the older Crows heeded the signs and gradually drew farther and farther away.

The younger Crows were growing bolder and bolder. They were showing off and having a wonderful time doing it. They were daring one another to tweak a few feathers from those Owls.

My, how impudent they were! And then, without any warning, Hooty suddenly darted at one of those Crows. Thornton W.

Burgess wrote 15,000 daily animal stories for newspapers from 1912 to 1960. About a tenth of those stories became books, and he was one of the most popular and loved authors of his time. But his darkest newspaper stories were never put into any book.

Until now. As usual, Jerry Muskrat was very much on the watch for possible danger. So it was that he was the first to discover the drifting shadow, which was not a shadow at all, but Hooty the Owl.

Instantly, Jerry gave the slap-tail danger signal and dived. Mrs. Muskrat repeated the signal and dived. Eight little Muskrats did the same thing.

But the ninth little Muskrat—the heedless young Muskrat, the one who thought himself so smart—merely chuckled and continued to sit on a little tussock, eating a tender bit of green stuff which he had found. He didn't even sit still, but moved about. Suddenly a little chill feeling of fear swept over him.

Burgess was one of the most knowledgeable naturalists of his time, and his animal stories are as educational as they are entertaining. But for years people joked that his predators never ate - that their prey always escaped just in the nick of time. Devoted readers knew that his predators did eat, though their meals were usually mentioned only in passing.

But starting in 1930, suddenly the predator's brutal killings were front and center. After years of educating children about the more agreeable habits of wild animals, he started educating them on gruesome truths about how predators caught their prey. He also started showing more of the frightful things certain two-legged creatures did to wild animals.

The children of the 1930s were tough; they took it pretty well. There is no record of mass protest among his many millions of devoted readers; nor of newspapers refusing to print the newly dark stories, nor of newspapers dropping the feature in droves. No, our grandparents and great-grandparents took it in stride.

Are today's children (and parents!) as strong? There is only one way to find out. Go ahead - the Bedtime Story Man dares you from across the grave!

All you have to lose is any delusion that wild animals live happy-go-lucky, trouble-free lives. The 41 chapters in this book were printed in newspapers across America in 1930 and 1931, and the bonus chapter, "Page From a Fly's Diary", was printed in newspapers in 1914. None of these 42 chapters were ever printed again, anywhere, until now.

Also included in this book: - Foreword by Peter Oehlkers, Salem State University, with background information from his Burgess research on these little-known dark stories. - Original newspaper illustrations for half of the stories, plus several spot illustrations, all by Burges's best-known illustrator, Harrison Cady. - An introduction to Thornton W.

Burgess. - A reader's guide to Thornton W. Burges's animal story books.


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