The Election of 1800 and the Election of 1876: The History and Legacy of the Presidential Elections Decided by Congress - PDF free download eBook

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Introduction

Includes pictures Includes contemporary descriptions of the campaigns, elections, and results Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading Includes a table of contents In 1800,...

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Details of The Election of 1800 and the Election of 1876: The History and Legacy of the Presidential Elections Decided by Congress

Original Title
The Election of 1800 and the Election of 1876: The History and Legacy of the Presidential Elections Decided by Congress
Edition Format
Kindle Edition
Number of Pages
139 pages
Book Language
English
Ebook Format
PDF, EPUB

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The Election of 1800 and the Election of 1876: The History and Legacy of the Presidential Elections Decided by Congress

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Includes pictures Includes contemporary descriptions of the campaigns, elections, and results Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading Includes a table of contents In 1800, Thomas Jefferson beat sitting President John Adams, albeit narrowly, and denied Adams the second term he coveted. Adams escaped to Massachusetts and left a curt note about th Includes pictures Includes contemporary descriptions of the campaigns, elections, and results Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading Includes a table of contents In 1800, Thomas Jefferson beat sitting President John Adams, albeit narrowly, and denied Adams the second term he coveted. Adams escaped to Massachusetts and left a curt note about the state of the White House stables behind.

No congratulations were exchanged, and the two men did not speak to one another for over a decade afterwards. Jefferson's election to the Presidency also left an important electoral legacy. By 1800, the Alien and Sedition Acts had made Adams an unpopular President, especially in the South.

Without formal parties to effectively nominate candidates in a President-Vice President ticket, the Democratic-Republicans had two nominees: Thomas Jefferson and New York's Aaron Burr, who had been tabbed to serve as Jefferson's Vice President. Once the Electoral College cast its ballots, Jefferson and Burr had the same number of electoral votes with 73, while Adams came in third with 65. This was, however, a mix-up.

The Democratic-Republican electors were supposed to have one elector abstain from voting for Burr, which would make Jefferson President and Burr Vice-President. In the 1800 election, states selected their electors from April until October. The last state to select its electors, South Carolina, selected Democratic-Republicans but neglected to have one voter abstain.

The final vote was thus a tie. As the Constitution prescribed, the election was determined in the House of Representatives. This proved problematic as well.

The Federalists controlled the House that decided who would be President. With Jefferson as their arch-nemesis, they were hardly happy to support him, and many initially voted for Burr. The first 35 ballots were always a tie between Burr and Jefferson.

Not until mid-February of 1801, when Alexander Hamilton, another of Jefferson's nemeses, came out to endorse the Vice President, did Jefferson come out ahead. Hamilton's disdain for Burr was so strong that he virtually handed the presidency to Jefferson, who had been his ideological opponent for the better part of a decade. Hamilton's decision created personal animus between Hamilton and Burr that stewed for years and famously culminated with the duel that ended Hamilton's life in 1804.

Many assumed that President Ulysses S. Grant, the popular Civil War general who was still a relatively young man at the end of his second term in office, would surely run for a third, but many Americans knew nothing of the scandals and corruption that had surrounded Grant's administration, and he wanted to keep it that way All of this set the stage for one of the strangest interludes in American history. As the nation's two major parties each put forth a large slate of candidates for nomination in 1876, two candidates had to come to the fore, and each party selected both a presidential and vice-presidential candidate.

These four men ran a bitterly contested race just to reach the general election, and that general election became the most controversial in American history. By the time results rolled in, Democrat Samuel Tilden had won the popular vote and was up by 19 electoral votes, but 20 electoral votes were disputed, and despite claims of fraud, the two sides eventually forged the Compromise of 1877, which gave the presidency to the Republican Rutherford B. Hayes in exchange for the removal of federal troops from the South.

The Compromise effectively ended the Reconstruction era, and while it helped bring about the sectional reconciliation of the country, it also allowed the Solid South to emerge, which included the implementation of Jim Crow across the region.


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